Dubliners

by (James Joyce)

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Book Information
Book Size (Inches) : 5.06 x 7.81
Binding : Paperback
Interior Color : Black & White
Language : English
Genre(s) : Short Story, Literature/Fiction
ISBN : 978-81-949412-8-6
Year : 2021
Pages : 236

About the Author

James Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, poet, teacher, and literary critic. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde movement and is regarded as one of the most influential and important writers of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, most famously stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in Dublin into a middle-class family. A brilliant student, he attended the Jesuit Clongowes Wood College in Kildare, then, briefly, the Christian Brothers-run O'Connell School before excelling at the Jesuit Belvedere College, despite the chaotic family life imposed by his father's unpredictable finances. He went on to attend University College Dublin.

Book Description

Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce. The stories comprise a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination, and the idea of paralysis where Joyce felt Irish nationalism stagnated cultural progression, placing Dublin at the heart of this regressive movement.

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